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  • Article
  • Jan 17, 2019

C3.ai Expands Across Europe

C3.ai Expands Across Europe

In an interview with French computer science magazine L’Informaticien, C3.ai CEO Thomas M. Siebel discussed building the C3.ai software capabilities to design, develop, deploy, and operate predictive analytics AI-based applications for industrial use cases.

The Third Life of Tom Siebel

By Editor in Chief Bertrand Garé

After working at Oracle on relational databases, and creating the industry category now known as CRM, Tom Siebel launched his software company C3.ai to address industry challenges that could only be addressed by AI technologies operating at industrial scale.

“I have always been committed to the technologies that will make a real difference in our lives. After relational databases and CRM, I believe the technologies at the frontiers of AI, the Internet of Things, and the cloud will bring about great changes,” said Siebel.

The C3 AI Suite PaaS allows customers to design, develop, deploy, and operate predictive analytics applications for industrial use cases. Energy companies Baltimore Gas & Electric (Excelon), Enel, and France-based ENGIE are customers, and partners include Intel and HPE.

At C3.ai, Siebel has brought together a number of data science specialists and researchers from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and Polytechnique in Paris, as well as academics from Turin in Italy, and from U.S universities Stanford and Berkeley. With offices across the world, C3.ai takes a global approach to meeting customer needs, yet delivers customized C3.ai AI software and applications.

Aiming for Smaller Businesses

The next step for C3.ai’s European growth is to release a simplified software suite for the needs of smaller organizations. This is better-suited to the needs of European industrial companies. The existing C3.ai applications will also be available via a software store, opening up the C3.ai software suite to organizations of all sizes.

While Siebel asserts, "the wave of AI cannot be stopped," governments must step in to monitor and regulate AI to avoid unintended negative consequences.

Read the original L’Informaticien article here.